Powerstrike Hammers | Review

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Is Powerstrike The Right Hammer?

If you’ve worked for any length of time in the trades, you understand the importance of a good hammer. For the uninitiated, hammers are not all created equal, which is why a trip down the hammer aisle at any supply store can be more than a little intimidating. Around the home, a simple 16 ounce hammer works for most projects; on the job, however, the right hammer makes a huge difference in both physical comfort and a professional outcome.

3 Hammers

Powerstrike hammers come in a variety of vibrant colors. You won’t lose them easily on the site.

Powerstrike hammers were born in 2013. I’ve had one of the first generation hammers since that time and have been more than pleased with its performance and quality. So, what makes Powerstrike worth the price? Let’s take an overall look at the tool and see.

Handle Design

The manufacturer uses a monocoque handle design. A mono-what? It’s a French word that means “single shell” or “single hull”.  An eggshell is a good example; its load is supported by its external skin. So too with the Powerstrike handle design. The aluminum shell takes the striking load, but is lightweight and ergonomically designed so it fits comfortably in your hand.

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The aluminum handle is designed for both comfort and power. It lives up to its claims, IMHO.

Call it whatever French word you like, this handle feels great in my hand and hasn’t given me a problem since day one. I can definitely feel the additional power from the steel head and the construction of the hammer hasn’t failed.

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Real men use pink hammers. That should be Powerstrike’s bumper sticker…

Interchangeable Heads

This isn’t a new concept in the world of hammers; but it’s certainly a handy feature to have when you’re working on different jobs and with different materials. PowerStrike offers a couple of options.

  • 17-4 Stainless Steel Bullseye Head
  • Smooth-face Titanium head
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Powerstrike’s interchangeable heads are reasonably easy and fast to change out

Side note: Interestingly, 17-4 stainless steel is actually stronger than titanium.

Head CU

An allen bolt is used to hold each head firmly in place. When it wears out or needs swapping for whatever reason, just loosen, replace and tighten.

 

Additional Powerstrike Features

  • Nail Starter: Niobium magnetic holder keeps the nail firmly in place for one-handed driving.
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The powerful magnet holds fasteners in place for one-handed setting. Yes, even bent nails…

  • Side Nail-Puller: Added leverage and workability in some situations.
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Always a handy feature, the side-puller gets to stubborn nails more easily.

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The claw is also designed nicely for leverage.

My Impressions

I’ve been quite pleased with the overall performance of Powerstrike’s tools. The quality of construction, head choices and ease of use have given me no negatives to write about. I’ve been asked how they compare to Stiletto’s hammers and my answer has been, “They seem to be on par.” I’m sure some will agree (and some won’t) with that statement. Most guys I know in the trades are pretty attached to their hammer (and specific brands).

From a pricing standpoint, Powerstrike hammers live in the same neighborhood as Stiletto; sometimes less. That doesn’t make it an inferior hammer; it just makes it a hammer with less name recognition – for now.

I doubt you’ll be disappointed with the Powerstrike’s performance, but because hammers are a lot like shoes – one size or style NEVER fits all, the only way is to give them a shot. You’ll be doing the American economy a favor, as all of their products are manufactured in Vista, California.

For more information from Powerstrike: CLICK HERE

Check price/purchase from Powerstrike: CLICK HERE

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Brad Staggs

Contributing Writer/Producer at Tool Skool
Brad has worked in and around the home improvement and tool industry most of his life. He was host of Talk2DIY Home Improvement, Co-produced DIY Tools & Techniques and is the author of Spend a Little, Save a Lot Home Improvement.